Making Your Maps More Interesting

Introduction:

A lot of Gimkit Creative is based on games such as Snowy Survival, Snowbrawl, One Way Out, or Fishtopia. After all, those games follow the great ideas of Dungeon Crawlers, Infection Games, Battle Royale Games, and Relaxing games where you make a lot of money.

Obviously, Gimkit didn’t create these ideas. They use the ideas, but ideas such as Battle Royales aren’t copyrighted, because you can’t copyright these ideas.

However, there’s a difference between creating a game with almost the exact same idea as a Gimkit game and elevating a concept above and beyond.

So in this PSA, I’ll talk about ways to make your games more interesting- to have more spice in them.


Quests:

Let’s be honest, quests are seriously some of the most fun and easy ways to add spice to your games. You can simply add a sentry and make it ask for something, and give you a reward. One of the ways a Fishtopia-styled game could be better is by adding quests that cost fish but give you a lot of quest rewards. I personally prefer quests to give make my games more interesting, because they’re easy to make and don’t take up a lot of memory.

You can use these guides to create better quests!


Twists:

This is an extremely effective way to create a game, and even Gimkit itself has used it in modes like Jeopardy or This or That. Instead of your average battle royale game, how about the battles are split into brackets, tournament style? The team that wins the most matches can win the game!

One example could be @CringeKarlScott’s Xtreme Laser Tag. Instead of it being your average battle royale game, you need to refill your weapons at beacons. When all your beacons are destroyed your team can’t refill their weapons anymore.

There’s not really a guide for twists, because they could really be anything.


Loot Tables:

Even if your game has nothing to do with loot tables, you can still somehow incorporate them into your game. A farming game could have loot tables by having a merchant give you random sales on crops. A dungeon crawler game could have loot tables by having broken crates give you random weapons.

Loot tables are pretty simple to create with block code. They can add a huge portion to the game.

You can learn more about loot tables here:


Dialogue:

Most games have beginning messages with everything thrown at you. Instead, you could slow it down a notch with dialogue! Instead of the player immediately knowing what’s happening, you can have the players learn the story/mission in chunks! Instead of “Your team at the facility was ambushed by plants. You now must escape before they take over your ship.” you could have a cutscene where plants suddenly enter and then you quickly teleport out of the cutscene area, to where the players are discussing their options.

Dialogue should be pretty easy to make with pop-up banners.


Lore:

Do you think anyone likes mindlessly doing tasks while not even knowing why? A way to do lore is to introduce the setting, and then secretly scatter bits of the past throughout the game, until the players finally learn everything about the game. This will encourage them to replay the game, and lore is usually positive.

Even Gimkit incorporates lore into their stories. Snowy Survival and One Way Out both reveal information about Chemical Supreme, Crafter and Vesper, and the Alphastar. That’s very creative, and you should strive to be like these games.


Systems:

What’s better than adding new concepts to your games? They don’t necessarily have to be new, but it would be great if you added a system that wasn’t fishing farming, or sentry killing. Maybe a bank, a merchant, or even minigames like Pac-Man!

In Farmchain, there’s crafting and research. In Snowy Survival, there’s an infection system and puzzles. In One Way Out, there are purple key cards hidden around the map, and you can even unlock legendary weapons!


Let the Player Find Things:

My favorite things about games are when there are puzzles, args, or things the players can just ignore. The thing about adding these things to the game is to have optional, challenging tasks the players can complete!

Players can do this in One Way Out to get legendary weapons or a final boss, and in Snowy Survival they can unlock the vault and the computer to craft Chemical Supreme.

You can also hide things around the map, for example, secret messages that reveal interesting things. You can also give players rewards for doing these things, like an overpowered weapon or really fast speed.


Bossfights:

This doesn’t really work for every game, but boss fights are entertaining, and can be fun to play. You can use dialogue, lore, lasers, popups, repeaters, and almost everything to create an interactive and creative boss fight!

They can also be mini boss fights, which are easier but are still pretty entertaining. Good luck adding this to your game!


End:

Well, that was all I could think of right now, but you guys can list more! I’m really happy to have come from a noob at Gimkit Creative who didn’t use properties, popups, counters, or repeaters to fully embrace a lot of things.

Again, I hope you try to add these into your games because they can really make everything a whole lot better.

Happy Gimkitting!

-@mysz

19 Likes

Nice guide Mysz!

5 Likes

Wow, great guide! This is really useful for making better maps.

5 Likes

Wonderful!

4 Likes

Awesome guide @mysz !

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great guide!

3 Likes

Great guide @mysz!

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Amazing guide!

3 Likes

bump

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Great Guide!!

1 Like

bumpers

i like creativity

1 Like

omg bump???
real not fake??????

4 Likes

bump.

1 Like

Bump.
I’m removing the PSA flairs from the psa guides.

Checklist

  1. Go shopping
  2. Harvest fruits
  3. bump this guide
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